17 sustainable development goals

In 2015 the United Nations adopted its 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It comprises 17 main goals that the international community aims to achieve by 2030. We’re publishing a series of news items and describing all these goals and how organisations and institutions can work towards them. In each article we’ll also be giving input on how to effectively communicate this engagement.

To facilitate global development, promote human wellbeing and protect the environment, in 2015 the UN set down 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs address a broad range of factors, focusing on environmental sustainability in addition to social and economic development. They also cover areas such as peace, security, justice and good governance that are crucial to sustainable development. To give private and public sector organisations ideas on how to get involved in making these sustainable development goals happen, we’re launching a series of news items presenting each goal individually. In each article we’ll also be giving tips on how to effectively communicate this engagement. We’ll start with the fight against poverty.

No poverty

The first goal on the Agenda for Sustainable Development is “no poverty”. The aim is to end extreme poverty in all its forms everywhere by 2030. There are still more than 800 million people, around 70 per cent of whom are women, living in extreme poverty. To thoroughly address the problem, in addition to the main goal the UN has set also set a sub-goal of ending relative poverty.

There are a number of factors underlying poverty. It affects people who are particularly hard hit by economic and political crisis, a loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services, natural disasters and violence. To ensure that people who escape poverty don’t fall back into it, the UN wants to help make them more resilient and set up social security systems.

polarstern news agenda 2030 ziel 1 muenzen

Poverty | By 2030 the goal is to end extreme poverty – currently defined as those who have less than USD 1.25 per day to live on – for all people worldwide.

Social security benefits and modern technology

Individual organisations can join the influential international community to help work towards the “no poverty” goal. NPOs, for example, can provide aid and assistance for people fleeing poverty. Companies with technical expertise may be able to support countries facing poverty with modern technology, for example developing and delivering products that enable natural disasters to be predicted earlier and avoided. Systems built on advanced technology can also help provide better protection from such catastrophes.

Support without specific products or services

Organisations that want to help combat poverty but can’t offer specific products and services of this sort have other options. For example there are numerous aid projects that welcome financial support in the form of donations. You can also launch your own campaign to raise funds to set up a project in a country affected by poverty. There’s also plenty of opportunity to cooperate on existing aid projects, which may be able to put resources within your organisation – your expertise and even your people – to good use.

Less is more

Once your organisation has found an appropriate way of getting involved in combating poverty, you should also communicate your efforts transparently. For example you can describe your involvement in concrete aid work in social media, or refer to it on your website or in your company portrait.

In addition to the online channels there are also a range of offline media you can use: posters, flyers, business reports (especially sustainability reports) can also serve as a vehicle for telling people about the partnerships and projects you’re involved in or make them aware of campaigns. It’s important to describe your involvement succinctly in attractive texts presented in an appealing visual design.

Polarstern Agenda 2030 Ziele Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)

Concrete engagement for the 2030 Agenda

In 2015 the United Nations passed its 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It comprises 17 main goals that the internationl community aims to achieve by 2030. We are publishing a series of news items and describing all these goals and how organisations and institutions can work towards them. In each article we’ll also be giving tips on how to effectively communicate this engagement.

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